Low Fodmap Snacks that are Perfect for Travellers with IBS

Low Fodmap Snacks that are Perfect for Travellers with IBS

Going on holiday can cause quite a few issues for people living with IBS, as I highlighted in a recent post offering my advice on travelling while on the low fodmap diet.

One of my top tips was to bring along your own low fodmap snacks, so I thought I’d put together this post on some of the most suitable snacks to take with you when out and about…

Low fodmap crisps

Ready salted crisps are pretty much the main option for low fodmappers, but there are some that are tastier than others. Good choices are Lightly Salted Kettle Chips and Tyrells’ Lightly Sea Salted.

My absolute favourite however are Eat Real’s Veggie and Kale Straws. These are both delicious and absolutely more-ish, and I eat them so regularly that I buy them in bulk from Amazon!

Make your own sandwiches

If I’m going on a day trip, or even taking a long-haul flight and want to stick to my diet, then I often make up my own low fodmap sandwiches. Supermarkets now have a wide range of gluten free breads to check out –  simply find some unflavoured meats or low fodmap spreads and make yourself up a yummy snack for while you’re on the go!

Popcorn & gluten free pretzels

salted popcorn and gluten free pretzels are good snacking options – as long as your somewhere that doesn’t expect silent chewing!

If you’re after some sweet travel snacks, why not take along some little bags of sweet popcorn? Quite a few out there now are low fodmap, you just need to check the ingredients to ensure there’s no sign of fructose, and if there’s not, you’re good to go.

Boiled eggs

Rolled in a little bit of sea salt, boiled eggs are a really tasty travel-friendly snack!

A low fodmap nut and seed mix

Why not make up a tub of mixed nuts and seeds for your travels? Safe options (in the right portion size) include, poppy, pumpkin, sesame, and sunflower seeds, along with peanuts, macademia nuts, almonds and walnuts.

Muesli and snack bars

Muesli and snack bars can be a good option for low fodmappers, but you need to take the time to check the packets for ingredients before you can find a couple that are suitable for you.

Fody has a range of snack bars that although aren’t cheap, you can rely on to be safe to eat without leaving you with IBS symptoms.

Make your own fruit bowls and salads

If you’re keen to eat healthy, then a good tip is to make up your own little Tupperware tubs of fodmap-friendly salads. Chop up some blueberries, grapes, pineapple, or strawberries for a fruit salad for example, or simply pop a banana, orange or kiwi fruit in your bag.

You can always make up some carrot or red pepper sticks, or pick up some fodmap friendly olives to take along, but when it comes to salads there’s a world of choice out there. For a great selection, from chicken pesto to pumpkin and quinoa, I recommend checking out Charlie’s Choice for 20 of the best low fodmap salad recipes.

Crisp breads and rice cakes

Personally I find crisp breads and rice cakes particularly bland, but many of my low fodmap friends swear by them and, of course, it’s all about livening them up with topping, like the dips below! Shar’s ever-growing range of low fodmap products includes some good crispbreads, so if they’re your thing, they may be worth checking out…

 Make your own dips

To liven up plain crisps, carrot sticks or those often dry low fodmap breadsticks, why not make up some of your own low fodmap dips? I live by this recipe for low fodmap pesto, but you can make a whole range of dips from smoky red pepper to tahini and herb. They’re really simple to make and there’s some great ones to try out at Cook Low Fodmap and A Less Irritable Life.

Low fodmap snacks – where to buy them?

So there you have it – my tips on the simplest and most enjoyable low fodmap snacks. Personally I recommend trawling the supermarkets to find out what ‘general’ items are low fodmap. This takes time, but is worth while as it will keep your food shopping costs down.

However, if you’re happy to pay a premium, there are a number of online shops popping up that are dedicated to selling low fodmap food. In the UK, these include Fody Foods and Fodmarket. Elsewhere in the world there are many others, especially if you’re based in the US or Australia, where the low fodmap diet originated from.

A note of advice

I hope many of you will find this small guide helpful, but a word of warning – always check the packaging for ingredients before trying something new. Sometimes companies can change their ingredients, adding something new that may not be low fodmap. Furthermore, we’re all unique, and there may be other food trigger ingredients you need to look out for. What’s fine for me may cause you problems, so use this as a guide, but make sure you do your own research!

Any snacks you can add?

I’d also love to hear your own recommendations for low fodmap snacks, so that this page can be a useful resource for fellow travellers who’re looking for low fodmap foods they can take with them while away. Please do share your tips and recommendations in the comments below!

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low fodmap snacks - perfect for travellers with IBS

 

 



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Two Traveling Texans
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Keri

By day Co-Editor Keri is a freelance journalist and copywriter, but spends most of her free time either travelling or planning her next trip!  A complete travel fanatic, she has a love of tropical climates, wildlife and afternoon tea (hence the creation of her Global Afternoon Tea Challenge!)

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2 Comments

  1. Anisa
    July 22, 2018 / 4:49 pm

    It’s so easy to forget how easy those of us without food issues have it. I am sure others that have IBS will really find this post helpful.

  2. July 23, 2018 / 2:01 am

    While I’m here in the US, we really should find some healthy low-carb, non-fat snacks for traveling which are actually hard to find in Germany. Thanks for sharing on #TheWeeklyPostcard!

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