Vegan travellers can often run into trouble whilst abroad. For example, you could be left hungry on occasion with no nearby options, end up eating veggie burgers for your whole trip as you’re unsure of where else to go or worse, not enjoy the right nutrients to power you through your trip – leaving you feeling tired all the time.

But you’ll be glad to know that it doesn’t have to be like this and you can have a positive experience on your holidays – it just comes down to a little preparation beforehand. So, here’s a few tips that could help you on your way and ensure you never have to deal with any of these issues again…

Tips for Vegan Travellers

1. Take the time to look up authentic vegan dishes in the country or countries you’re visiting. When I visited Marrakech, I was worried it’d be countless lamb tagines but after doing a little research, there’s plenty of vegan salads and couscous dishes that were absolutely phenomenal upon trying them.

2. Utilise social media channels like Instagram or Pinterest to find top vegan foodie spots from around the world. Hashtags like #vegantravel or ‘vegan food in [country]’ have often saved me when I’ve been abroad and lost for somewhere to eat. It especially helped me when I was in Iceland and stuck for somewhere to eat. Likewise, you can always get in touch with the people who run these type of accounts or vegan travel blogs, like Indefinite Adventure or City Loveee, and ask them – this has also helped me out on occasion.

vegan-travellers

3. If you can’t find a compatible hotel, it can often be easier to book a rented space with a kitchen and go self-catering as opposed to a hotel. AirBnB is perfect for options like this all over the world – what’s more, you may even be fortunate enough to have a vegan host! Having a kitchen means you can pick up raw materials and cook for yourself. I opted for this approach in Barbados, with a supermarket just down the road – it led to the cheapest meals too!

4. Use a simple language app, even Google Translate will suffice, to learn key questions about the food you may consume e.g. ‘Is this vegan?‘ or ‘Does this contain egg/milk/meat?‘ etc. This really helped me out when I was on the French Riviera, one of the more tricky destinations I’ve been to as a vegan. This tip helps if menus and signs aren’t 100 per cent clear or in a language you don’t understand. It’s also a good idea to remember key words like lactose, gluten free or meat free.

vegan-travellers

5. You can always ask the local tourist board for information when you’re there or before you travel on social media. Most tourist boards now have a Twitter account, so they often respond with recommendations about their countries. For example, I asked the Canary Islands if they could advise me on any health stores on the island of Fuerteventura – they came back with great recommendations that meant I was never hungry on my trip.

6. Carry snacks with you, just in case. I always travel around with dried fruit, nuts and TREK bars so I’m never caught short for something to nibble on when I need sustenance. When I was in Bangkok, this aided me more than anywhere else – it was hot, humid and exhausting but these snacks saw me through the long days of exploring.

dried-fruit

7. Notify all hotels, airlines, hosts and activity leaders before you set off on your trip. This helps them prepare for your arrival and stock up on vegan food (if they are so kind). They’ll thank you for the notice and you’ll get the food you require to make your trip a stress-free one.

8. Don’t forget to pack multi-vitamins, minerals or probiotics. Although it may be easy to stick to your diet in your home country because you know how, you’ll need to keep your strength and your vitamin/mineral levels up abroad. Packing a little tub of these should help you keep regulated.

If you have any more tips, then feel free to add them to the comments below.

8 tips for vegan travellers | Ladies What Travel

 

2 thoughts on “8 Tips For Vegan Travellers

  1. I often face many difficulties in getting vegan dishes. I keep fruits and dry fruits in my purse. However, these are some great tips that I didn’t know. Thanks for sharing 🙂

  2. Thanks for the tips. It’s slightly easier to travel as a vegetarian rather than a vegan, but can still be a pain in some countries where that type of diet is uncommon. Sampling the local cuisine is one of the fun parts of travelling even if it has to be adapted!

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